There’s news. And then there’s news. The news that comes out of the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center can change lives. For people with diabetes and those who care for them, and about them. So it makes sense to stay on top of all the latest. Both the news the Center puts out through this site, and the frequent media coverage we get based on our important and exciting findings and the authoritative voices that speak for us.

Berrie Center Kids Connect with Slime: A Sensory Therapeutic Experience

One part water, one part glue, one part liquid starch, add a little food coloring and presto, you have just created super gooey slime—a substance that is both icky and sticky yet fun and familiar especially if you’re a child. 

A Toy Story

Thank you to Jenna Fox, 13, Cara Curtin, 14 and Gianna Eglauf, 13 who recently came to the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center bearing bags and bags of puzzles, bug catchers, Playdoh and lots of other goodies. 

Zaphiria Rotos Dancing With a Star

Twelve-year-old Zaphiria Rotos, is a proud 7thgrader at Commack Middle School in Commack, NY. She is a high honor roll student, as well as an accomplished dancer.  Zaphiria, a patient at the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center, is a motivated, committed, competitive dancer, who practices five

Cara Hass, Family Nurse Practioner “Caring and Competent”

When Cara Hass was a nursing student and working at a community health center in Connecticut, she remembers observing group medical visits for people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). “The patients absolutely loved going,” she recalled.

Berrie Center Scientists Receive Vagelos Precision Medicine Pilot Grant

Congratulations to Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center scientist Utpal Pajvani, MD, PhD, who received a Roy and Diana Vagelos Precision Medicine inaugural Pilot Grant—a 2-year, $200,000 award intended to support groundbreaking research relevant to advancing the basic science of precision medicine.

A Graduate Student at the Berrie Center Studies T-cells and Type 1 Diabetes

She studies a population of immune system cells called T-cells. They are the cells that go on to destroy the insulin-producing beta cells that lead to the insulin deficiency seen in type 1 diabetes (T1D). But it is how graduate student Rachel Madley studies these T-cells that is interesting.

April e-newsletter

 

Click here to read our featured stories:

More Winter Fun For Berrie Center Teens

Participating in a Unique Clinical Trial 

A Strength-based Art Project Empowers Young Girls

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